December 23, 2016



You have all been absolutely wonderful. 
Thank you for reading the blog and comments you have left.

Have a wonderful Christmas and a great 2017. 

See you the next year with more recipes.

leftover

Winter Bread

December 22, 2016


A traditional Finnish Christmas bread is marked with a cross on the top, sweet and full with spices. A good addition is leftover mash as many Finns are brewing kotikalja (a malty low-alcohol, home-made table beer closely resembling kvass) for Christmas. This is one version of these breads, which are lovely addition to breakfast breads throughout the winter.

1 bread 

2 dl (200 g) mash and 1,5 dl (150 g) water 
or 3 dl (300 g) boiling water and 0,5 dl (40 g) rye malt 
30 g fresh yeast 
1 tsp salt 
1 dl (140 g) Scandinavian dark syrup (or light molasses) 
3 tsp Seville orange peel powder (bitter orange peel powder) 
2 dl (230 g) sugared lingonberry mash 
2 dl (100 g) rye flour 
9 dl (500 g) dark wheat flour 
50 g butter 
For the glaze: 
syrup water (half and half) 

Stir the yeast, salt and syrup into the lukewarm mash and water mix. Add Seville orange peel powder and sugared lingonberry mash. Gradually mix in the flours and knead the dough for couple of minutes. Add soft butter and knead for further 8 minutes. 

Cover and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead it gently. Take a piece of dough aside. Form the rest of the dough into a round loaf and place it on the baking tray. Decorate the bread with the piece of dough you set aside using water as a glue. 

Cover and leave to rise for 30 minutes. 

Preheat the oven to 175°C. Brush with syrup water and bake for an hour and 15 minutes. Brush with syrup water after an hour again and the third time 10 minutes later. 

Cover and let cool on a wire rack.



oat

Oat Bread

December 15, 2016


Many food agencies worldwide, including The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), have approved health claims attributed to oat. Oat bran contains beta glucan, which has the ability to reduce cholesterol levels, decrease the elevation of blood glucose after a meal and improve digestion. 

No wonder, that the demand for oat is rising, particularly in Europe and the US. Where all oat grains come from? Where do your oat grains come from? There's a good chance that they come from Finland, which it's the second-largest exporter of oat in the world, sending about 350,000 tons abroad annually. 

Finland's cool weather, clean soil and farming practices that include fewer pesticides and fertilizers provide optimum conditions to oat farming. As a result, the excellent quality of Finnish oat make them highly attractive to oat product companies. 

Finnish bakeries offer many different sorts of oat bread that meet the needs of consumers, but a home-baked bread is always the best. This is one of my favorite recipes. 

2 breads 

8 dl (800 g) milk or water 
50 g fresh yeast 
2 tsp salt 
2 tbsp vegetable oil 
2 dl (200 g) sunflower seeds 
2 dl (70 g) rolled oats 
10 dl (550 g) dark wheat flour 
5 dl (300 g) wheat flour 

Dissolve yeast and salt into lukewarm milk or water. Add oil, sunflower seeds and rolled oats. Gradually mix in flours and knead the dough about 10 minutes. 

Don't leave to rise. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead it gently. Divide the dough in half. Shape the pieces into two loaves and roll them in rolled oats. Line two baking trays with parchment papers and place the breads on them. 

Leave to rise at room temperature. 

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Bake for 30–40 minutes. The bread is ready if it sounds hollow, when you knock on its base. 

Let cool on a wire rack.

malt

Top 3 Christmas Breads

December 09, 2016

Islander Bread


Almost every baker here in Finland knows this classic recipe, because Islander Bread is The Christmas Bread here in Turku and all over Finland. Everyone must have a loaf or two waiting for the dinner on Christmas Eve.

Islander Bread is a perfect match with smoked ham, fish, home-made fresh cheese or gouda. Or, why not to try it with blueberry jam and goat cheese?


Christmas Bread


This festive rye bread combines all the best parts of Christmas, almonds, dates and dark chocolate. How could you resist it? What's more, you can bake this bread with sourdough starter or with yeast.


Finnish Christmas Loaf


I bake Islander Bread for Christmas, but my family likes traditional Finnish Christmas Loaf too. So, I have a habit of baking the latter in November. This is a lovely bread as such, but also a delicious toast for breakfast.

Welcome to the renewed site!

December 08, 2016

Butter Rolls

I'm sitting here with a cup of café au lait. It's done! I have just launched a new version of this blog. I hope you enjoy the "new" site as much as I do. No need to worry, all the old recipes are still here, and new ones are coming as they have done before, approximately one recipe per week.

I'd also like to ask you to do something. If you tried a recipe from the blog, please take a minute to leave a comment on it describing your results, good or bad. This way you can really help people who may be thinking about making a particular recipe. 


Welcome!





 

granola

Polar Night Granola

December 01, 2016


My son has gone nuts for this granola. He would like to eat this every morning, but his boring mother keeps making porridge too. So, we don't eat this on every breakfast, but often. This is a lovely way to start a new day during polar night and black winter season. 

11 dl (400 g) old fashioned oats 
2 dl (80 g) rice flakes 
1 dl (35 g) coconut flakes, coarsely crushed 
2 dl (170 g) brown sugar 
4 dl (250 g) peanuts 
1 dl (100 g) sunflower seeds 
0,5 dl (30 g) sesame seeds 
2 dl (200 g) water 
1 dl (90 g) coconut oil 
1 tsp ginger 
2 dl (1 cup, US) dried dates or plums 

Combine the flakes, sugar, roughly chopped nuts and seeds in a large bowl. Mix the water, oil and ginger and pour the wet-mix into the dry-mix. Stir well. Line a large baking tray with a baking paper sheet and spread the granola on top. 

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Place the baking tray on the center rack of the heated oven. Bake for 40 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce the temperature to 150°C and bake for 10 minutes. Make sure the granola is completely dry and remove from the oven. 

Allow the granola to cool for 30 minutes. Sprinkle dried dates or plums (cut in raisin-size pieces) on top. Stir well. Cool the granola completely. 

Store in an airtight jar. Enjoy with yoghurt.


roll

Chewy Rolls

November 24, 2016


These rolls aren't the pretties small breads in the world, but the taste is awesome and the soft, chewy texture inside is just perfect. What's more, the recipe is super easy. 

12 pcs.

5 dl (500 g) water
25 g fresh yeast
1 tsp salt
2 tsp sugar 
12–13 dl (800 g) wheat flour

Dissolve yeast, salt and sugar in cold water. Gradually mix in the flour and knead the dough for 10 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for an hour.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead about 3 minutes. Roll the dough into a rope. Cut the rope into 12 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Line two baking trays with parchment papers, place the rolls on them. Spray with water and leave to rise (uncovered) at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Place a roasting pan with plenty of water on the lowest rack of your oven and preheat the oven to 200°C. Spray the rolls with water again and bake for 25 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.

Quick Conversions and Other Useful Facts

November 23, 2016


Photo Hotel and Restaurant Museum, hrm.finna.fi, licenced under CC BY-ND 4.0 -licence.
Workers of restaurant Kantakrouvi, Kauhajoki FInland, in 1963.


Yeast

Fresh yeast has been used in all the recipes. If substituting dried yeast, use only half the specified amount and follow the instructions given on the package.
Baking times 

Celsius to Fahrenheit (°C to °F) conversion

Learn how your oven behaves – and trust your knowledge. The instructions in the recipes are guidelines. Your experience tells you which time, temperature or shelf works best. The general rule is that baking times should usually be reduced for fan ovens. 

150 °C 300 °F 
175 °C 350 °F 
200 °C 400 °F 
225 °C 425 °F 
250 °C 475 °F 
275 °C 525 °F 

Cup to deciliter (cup to dl) conversion 

1 cup (US) 2,4 dl 
1 cup (UK) 2,8 dl 

Deciliter to grams (dl to g) conversion

1 dl = 7 tbsp 

milk 100 g 
buttermilk 100 g 
water 100 g 
wheat flour 65 g 
rye flour 55 g 
dark wheat flour 55 g 
barley flour 55 g 
graham flour 60 g 
corn flour 55 g 
rye malt for bread (flour) 60 g 
oat flakes 35 g 
rye flakes 35 g 
spelt flakes 35 g 
oat bran 55 g 
wheat bran 20 g 
linseeds 60 g 
sunflower seeds100 g 
pumpkin seeds 60 g 
sesame seeds 60 g 
nuts 60 g 
raisins 60 g 
Scandinavian dark syrup 140 g 
honey 140 g 
vegetable oil 90 g 
butter, melted 90 g


rye

Finnish Christmas Loaf

November 16, 2016


















I bake Islander Bread for Christmas, but my family likes traditional Finnish Christmas Loaf too. So, I have a habit of baking the latter in November. This is a lovely bread as such, but also a delicious toast for breakfast. 

1 bread

3 dl (300 g) buttermilk
25 g fresh yeast
0,5 dl Scandinavian dark syrup (or light molasses)
1 tsp salt
2 tsp Seville orange peel powder (bitter orange peel powder)
2 tsp fennel seeds, coarsely crushed
3 dl (170 g) rye flour
3,5 dl (220 g) wheat flour
For the glaze:
syrup water (half and half)

Stir the yeast, syrup and salt into the lukewarm buttermilk. Add spices and rye flour. Gradually mix in the wheat flour and knead the dough for 6–8 minutes.

Cover and leave to rise at room temperature for about 40 minutes.


Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it. Shape the dough into a loaf and put it into an oiled tin.

Cover and leave to rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Bake for an hour or so. Brush with syrup water after 40 minutes and the second time 10 minutes later.

Take the loaf out of the tin, cover and let cool on a wire rack.


rye

Linseed Bread

November 09, 2016


I have carried numerous sacks of carrots and linseeds to horses during the years, but they are tasty ingredients in a bread dough too. 

1 bread

1,5 dl (150 g) water 
1 dl (60 g) linseeds 
4 dl (260 g) wheat flour 
2 dl (110 g) rye flour 
1 dl (100 g) sourdough 
2 dl (200 g) lukewarm water 
a pea-sized amount of fresh yeast 
1 tsp salt 
1 tbsp cooking oil 
1 small carrot 

Pour 1,5 dl of hot water over linseeds. Let cool. Add both flours and the sourdough. Dissolve a pea-sized amount of fresh yeast and salt into 2 dl of lukewarm water. Pour the water mix, oil and grated carrot into the bowl too. Knead for 8–10 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 2 hours. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and shape it into a loaf. Put the bread into a well-floured proofing basket. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature. It will take, at least, for one hour. 

Put an old metal tin on the bottom shelf of the oven and preheat the oven to 275°C. Line a baking tray with parchment paper and flip the bread on it. Put the bread into the oven and pour hot water into the tin at the same time. Turn the temperature down to 225°C. Bake for 25–30 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.





oat

Siblings

November 02, 2016


Pull-apart-rolls are called sibling rolls in Finland. So, I named these Siblings. This is an easy and quick recipe for beginners. I promise you, every sister or brother can bake these!

You can follow the recipe or cut the yeast in half (25 g). In the latter case the rise time is longer. It gives the yeast time to work, which improves the flavor of the rolls. 

12 pcs. 

5 dl (500 g) water 
50 g fresh yeast 
2 tsp salt 
0,5 dl (40 g) cooking oil 
3 dl (50 g) oat bran 
10–11 dl (650-700 g) wheat flour 

Dissolve yeast and salt in lukewarm water. Stir in cooking oil and oat bran. Gradually mix in the flour and knead until smooth and elastic. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead it. Roll the dough into a rope and cut it into 12 pieces. Shape each piece into a ball. Line a baking tray with a parchment paper and place the rolls closely together on it. 

Cover and let rise for 30 minutes. At the same time, preheat the oven to 225°C.

Sprinkle with cooking oil and oat bran. Bake for 20 minutes. 

Cover and let cool on a wire rack.








no-yeast

Turnip Rieska

October 26, 2016


One of the joys of autumn is a hot turnip rieska topped with melting butter. I have a craving for it at the latest in October, and it won't go away until I have looked up my old, trusted recipe and baked them.

6 pcs.

1 turnip (250 g)
1 tsp salt
1 dl (100 g) buttermilk
0,5 dl (45 g) cooking oil
2 dl (110 g) rye flour
2 dl (130 g) wheat flour

Peel the turnip and cut it into cubes. Bring a pot of unsalted water to a boil. Add the cubes and cook until tender. Mash with 0,5 dl (50 g) of cooking water and let cool for a while. 

Stir all the ingredients together. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and shape it into 6 thin, round breads. Line two baking trays with parchment papers and place the rieskas on them.

Preheat the oven to 225°C. Bake for 15 minutes. 

Enjoy the rieskas straight out of the oven topped with butter.

crispbread

Kale Crispbread

October 19, 2016



Kale Crispbread has a strong taste. If you make 40–50 pieces, you might want to eat them with a creamy, mild dipping sauce. 

20 pcs. 

1 L (4 cup, US) kale, coarsely chopped, ribs removed 
1 dl (60 g) linseeds 
0,5 dl (30 g) chia seeds 
0,5 dl (50 g) sunflower seeds 
0,5 dl (30 g) cornmeal 
2 tbsp cooking oil 
0,5 tsp salt 
0,5 tsp pepper mix 
2 small onions 
4 cherry tomatoes 

Put all the ingredients into a food processor and blend. 

Line a 28 x 35 cm baking tray with a parchment paper and turn the dough out onto it. Flatten the dough with wet hands. Cut the sheet into 20 squares with a knife or a roller cutter. 

Preheat oven to 100 °C. Bake for 45 minutes. Flip. Remove the paper and bake another 45 minutes. Break into pieces and bake for a further 10 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.

rye

Fake Rye Bread

October 12, 2016


Fake it or make it! 

No one will ever believe this is a wheat bread! The bread looks like a rye bread and tastes like a rye bread too. More than one of my friends have wondered the perfect match of southern basil and northern rye. The herb gives flavour to the bread when the bread is fresh. But, if you freeze it – Simsalabim! – even the taste of basil will vanish and the bread is a true rye bread. The disguise is flawless and complete. 

1 bread

5 dl (500 g) whey (or water) 
2 tbsp basil paste 
1,5 tsp salt
2 tbsp chia seeds 
4 tbsp linseeds
1 tsp fresh yeast
11 dl (550 g) roll flour (wheat flour and wheat bran) 

Stir together the ingredients. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature for 18–20 hours. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and shape it into a loaf. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature for 2 hours. 

Place a lidded cast iron pot in the cold oven and preheat it to 225°C. Remove the lid and put the risen dough into the hot pot. Place the lid back on top and put the pot back into the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, and bake for a further 15 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack. Enjoy!

roll

Pea Rolls

October 06, 2016


Peas are excellent and inexpensive source of protein. But, I have to make a confession, I like a diverse food basket and honest, homemade food. I don't care about proteins, carbohydrate etc. – or the latest healthy food trends. So, I use crushed, dried peas and pea flour just because they give a great taste to breads. It's a good reason too, isn't it?

8 pcs. 

4 dl (400 g) water 
0,5 dl (0,2 cup, US) crushed dried peas 
0,5 dl (0,2 cup, US) pea flour 
25 g fresh yeast 
1 tsp salt 
1 tbsp dried chive 
7 dl (450 g) wheat flour 

Boil up water. Add crushed peas and pea flour. Stir. Set aside to cool. 

In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast and salt in lukewarm water and pea mix. Stir in dried chive. Gradually mix in the flour and knead the dough for 10 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead about 3 minutes. Roll the dough into a rope. Cut the rope into 8 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Line two baking trays with parchment papers, place the rolls on them, cover and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Preheat the oven to 225°C. Bake for 15 minutes. 

Cover and let cool on a wire rack.

oat

45 Minute Rolls

September 27, 2016


Fresh baked rolls in just 45 minutes, start to finish? It's possible. These rolls will be on your table in a flash of an eye.

12 pcs.

5 dl (500 g) skimmed milk
50 g fresh yeast
1 tsp salt
1 tsp rosemary
1 tsp sweet pepper powder
0,5 dl (90 g) cooking oil
2 dl (70 g) rolled oats
9 dl (600 g) wheat flour

Stir the yeast into lukewarm milk. Add the rest of the ingredients. Stir.

Pour the dough onto a baking tray covered with parchment paper. Spread it to form a 25 x 35 cm rectangle. Sprinkle with rolled oats.

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for about 30 minutes. At the same time, preheat the oven to 225°C. 

Use a knife of a dough scraper and mark the bread into 12 pieces. Bake for 15 minutes.

Let cool on a wire rack.

leftover

Lingonberry Bread

September 21, 2016


Approximately 500 million kg of berries grow in Finland’s forests every year. Despite urbanization, the tradition of picking wild berries is a common autumn occupation for more than half of Finns, irrespective of their age or socioeconomic status. 

I love to walk in the woods with my little boy and return home with blueberries, lingonberries, raspberries, cloudberries and mushrooms. I usually put them in freezer boxes and freeze them. 

One thing is for sure, autumn is not an autumn without refreshing lingonberry juice. Luckily, we have forests full of lingonberries, the red gold of the Nordic forests, this year. It was easy to pick 3 kg of berries and it was a blessing I didn't have to put them into the freezer, it was full in September.

The sieved juice leaves some lingonberry pulp behind. I add the pulp to bread doughs, smoothies or porridges within 24 hours or freeze it for use in later. 

If you don't make the juice, substitute the leftover berry mash with mashed lingonberries. The pulp is not as dry as the sieved mash from the juice, but the recipe will still work just fine. 


Lingonberry juice


about 4 L (17 cups, US) 
3 kg lingonberries 
1,5 kg water 
1 tbsp tartaric acid 
400–450 g sugar per 1 kg juice 

Clean, rinse and mash the lingonberries. Add the water. Stir. Cover and leave at room temperature overnight. 

Sieve and measure the juice. (Put the mashed lingonberries aside for further use.) Add tartaric acid and sugar. Stir until the sugar has dissolved. 

Bottle in clean bottles. Serve cold with water or mineral water. The juice will last for up to 4 months in a cool, dark place like your pantry or the refrigerator. 

Lingonberry bread


2 breads 

5 dl (500 g) water 
50 g fresh yeast 
1,5 tsp salt 
1 dl (140 g) Scandinavian dark syrup (or light molasses) 
3 dl (1,2 cup, US) lingonberry mash (leftover juice lingonberries) 
2 dl (70 g) rye flakes 
50 g melted butter 17 dl (1100 g) wheat flour

Stir the yeast, salt and syrup into lukewarm water. Add lingonberry mash, rye flakes, melted butter and wheat flour. knead the dough for 8–10 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes.

Pour the mixture into the prepared 2-liter baking tin and level the surface. Cover and let rise for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Bake for 50–60 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.


no-yeast

Raw Liquorice Rye Bread

September 14, 2016



















Raw Liquorice Rye Bread has a pleasantly bitter taste. The bitterness is obvious on the first day. Later the taste gets more balanced and rounded.

1 bread

4 dl (400 g) lukewarm water
1 dl (100 g) sourdough starter
3 tbsp molasses
0,25 tsp raw liquorice powder
1 tsp salt
2 dl (1 cup, US) salad seed mix (sunflower and pumpkin seeds, pine nuts, dried cranberries)
5 dl (300 g) rye flour 
5 dl (300 g) wheat flour

Blend lukewarm water, sourdough starter, molasses, raw liquorice powder and salt. Add salad seed mix, 5 dl of the rye flour and the wheat flour. Knead for 5 minutes.

Cover and let rise for 12–14 hours at room temperature.

Turn the dough out onto a generously floured surface and shape it into a loaf. Put the bread into an oiled bread tin.

Cover and let rise.

Preheat the oven to 250°C. Bake for 5 minutes, turn the temperature down to 200°C and cook for a further 40 minutes.

Slide from the tin and let cool on a wire rack. When cooled, wrap the bread and store at room temperature overnight. You don't have to hurry, the bread stores well and only gets better with time.

Spread cream cheese on a slice of bread and put cucumber slices on it. Enjoy!


leftover

Malted Orange Rolls

September 07, 2016


In the summertime I make often cheese and home-made beer. Consequently, I have lots of whey and mash in my freezer at the moment. If you don't have them, you can replace mash with malt and hot water and whey with water (or, in this case, orange juice mixed with water). 

20 pcs.

2 dl (200 g) mash (leftover from brewing beer)
8 dl (800 g) whey
50 g fresh yeast
1 tbsp salt
1 orange, grated zest and juice
1 dl (140 g) Scandinavian dark syrup (or light molasses)
4 dl (150 g) rolled oats 
20–22 dl (1300–1400 g) wheat flour

Stir the yeast, salt, orange (zest and juice) and syrup into lukewarm whey/mash mix. Mix in the rolled oats. Keep kneading and adding wheat flour. It's impossible to tell the exact amount of wheat flour to use, it depends on the moisture of the mash and the amount of juice in the orange. But, less is always better than too much. Leave the dough as moist as you can. It's supposed to be moist and wet. 

Cover the bowl and let the dough rise for 20 minutes. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Use a dough scraper to assist you and fold the dough gently couple of minutes. Divide the dough in half. Roll each half into a rope. Cut each rope into 10 pieces. Shape each piece into a roll. Line 3 baking trays with parchment papers, place the rolls on them, cover and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 225°C. Bake for 15–20 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.


grilling

Cast Iron Skillet Breads

September 01, 2016


Cast Iron Skillet Bread is number No.1 on our TOP 10 Breads list at the moment. They are irresistible! 

The first batch of dough was eaten by my family before I had a chance to take all the photos I needed for the blog. "I can't help myself!" was the answer, when I tried to save some. 

I use a cast iron skillet and a stove, but you can make the breads on a grilling stone over an open fire too. 

12 pcs. 

4 dl (400 g) skimmed milk 
(12 g) fresh yeast 
1 tbsp sugar 
1 tsp salt 
1 tsp coriander seeds, crushed
0,5 dl (0,2 cup, US) melted butter 
9-10 dl (600-650 g) wheat flour 
butter 

Dissolve yeast, sugar and salt in lukewarm milk. Stir in crushed coriander seeds and melted butter. Gradually mix in the flour and knead the dough for 5 minutes. 

Cover the bowl with a tea towel and let rise for an hour or so. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead about 3 minutes. Roll the dough into a rope and cut it into 12 equal pieces. Shape each piece into a ball.




Cover with the tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes.

Heat a cast iron skillet (or a grilling stone) over medium heat. Working with one ball at a time, flatten it into a disc until it is about ¼ inch thick. Place the dough onto the hot skillet and cook for 4 minutes per side. Stack on top of each other and brush one side with butter.








sourdough

Saturday Bread

August 24, 2016


I make Saturday Bread on the days I want to enjoy the process of baking. I knead the dough by hand and nurse the dough for several hours. Baking makes me happy!

1 bread

50 g sourdough starter
3 dl (300 g) lukewarm water
0,75 tsp salt
2 tsp honey
6 dl (400 g) wheat flour

Blend lukewarm water, salt and honey with the starter dough. Add 5 dl of the flour and knead for 5 minutes. Add the remaining flour and knead the dough for another 5 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let the dough rise for an hour at room temperature.

Fold the dough. Cover and let rise for half an hour. Fold. Cover and let rise for 4 hours.

Line a 20 x 20 -cm bread tin with a parchment paper. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface, shape it gently into a round bread and put it into a tin.

Cover and let rise for 3 hours at room temperature.

Preheat the oven to 250°C. Bake for 15 minutes, turn the temperature down to 200°C and cook for a further 15 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.

leftover

Potato Rolls

August 17, 2016


The addition of mashed potatoes makes for some deliciously moist, soft bread. So, if you have some leftover mashed potatoes, it's a time to use them to make these wonderful rolls.

12 pcs.

5 dl (500 g) milk
50 g fresh yeast 
2 tbsp honey 
2 tsp salt 
2 tbsp caraway seeds 
0,5 dl (50 g) cooking oil 
2 dl (1 cup, US) mashed potatoes 
about 15 dl (1 kg) wheat flour 

In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast, honey and salt in lukewarm milk. Stir in caraway seeds, cooking oil and mashed potatoes. Gradually mix in the flour and knead the dough for 10 minutes. It's impossible to tell the exact amount of wheat flour to use, it depends on the moisture of the mashed potatoes. If you are unsure, a little less is always better than too much. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead about 3 minutes. Roll the dough into a rope and cut it into 12 pieces. Shape each piece into a ball. Line two baking trays with parchment papers, place the rolls on them, cover and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Preheat the oven to 225°C. Score the rolls with a sharp knife or a razor blade attached to a grilling stick. Bake for 15 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.


tin

No-knead Walnut Pot Bread

August 12, 2016

This bread is incredibly easy to make and requires no kneading with your hands. The secret of the recipe is a hot cast iron pot with a lid, which ensures that moisture is held in the bread. 

This recipe is one of my favorites, because the nutty bread is a perfect pair with the Norman white mould cheese I have loved for years. 

1 bread 

7,5 dl (500 g) wheat flour 
1,5 tsp salt 
2 dl (120 g) walnuts 
3 dried figs 
a pea-sized amount of fresh yeast 
3,5 dl (350 g) water 

Coarsely crush the walnuts and cut the dried figs into raisin-sized pieces. 

Stir together the ingredients. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature for 12–24 hours. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and shape it into a loaf. Put the bread into an oiled bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Place a lidded cast iron pot in the cold oven and preheat it to 225°C. Remove the lid and flip the risen dough into the hot pot. Place the lid back on top and put the pot back into the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove the lid, and bake for a further 15 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack. Enjoy!

rye

Finnish Soda Bread

August 03, 2016














Unexpected visitors! Finnish Soda Bread comes to my rescue. It's at its best straight from the oven with a slice of butter and Emmental cheese on the top.

1 bread

3,5 dl (200 g) rye flour
3,5 dl (200 g) wheat flour
1,5 tsp salt
2 tsp baking soda
4 dl (400 g) buttermilk
0,5 dl (70 g) Scandinavian dark syrup (or light molasses)
0,5 dl (60 g) lingonberry jam
1 dl (60 g) lingonberries 
Butter and rolled rye flakes for greasing the baking tin

Combine flour mix, salt and baking soda. Stir in buttermilkl, syrup, lingonberry jam and lingonberries. Pour the mixture into the prepared 2-liter baking tin and level the surface.

Preheat the oven to 175°C. Bake for 70 minutes.

roll

Spelt Rolls

July 27, 2016


With its origins around 7,000 B.C., spelt is one of the oldest cultivated grains. The oldest find of spelt grain from Finland is dated to about 300 AD from Salo, in Southwestern Finland. Recently it has been rediscovered. Some of the renewed interest centres on its health benefits, but bakers love it because spelt flour makes an incredibly tasty, nutty breads.

I like to bake with spelt flour too, but this time I use spelt grains and rolled spelt. 

12 pcs. 

2 dl spelt grains 
water 
5 dl (500 g) milk 
50 g fresh yeast 
1,5 tsp salt 
1 tbsp honey 
2 dl (250 g) quark 
2 dl (80 g) rolled spelt 
12 dl (800 g) wheat flour 

Boil up water and 2 dl spelt grains. Simmer for 15 minutes. Set aside to cool. Pour out the water. 

In a large mixing bowl, dissolve yeast, salt and honey in lukewarm milk. Stir in quark, spelt grains and rolled spelt. Gradually mix in the flour and knead the dough for 10 minutes. 

Cover with a tea towel and let rise for 30 minutes. 

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead about 3 minutes. Divide the dough in half. Roll each half into a rope. Cut each rope into 6 pieces. Shape each piece into a ball. Line two baking trays with parchment papers, place the rolls on them, cover and leave to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes. 

Preheat the oven to 250°C. Bake for 15 minutes. 

Let cool on a wire rack.


rye

Wild Rye Bread

July 20, 2016


Well, I think that the photo above tells it all. You know why the recipe of the week is called Wild Rye Bread. It was rainy but warm day and my sourdough decided to hop out of the tin. This kind of things happen when you are baking with sourdough. It's never boring!

The mess looked bad, but it was easily cleared up. I scraped off the excess dough and put it into muffin cups, kept the rest of the dough up with a foil and baked it all. I took the muffin cups out of the oven earlier. They were tasting bites. The loaf came out later and it was just fine too. 

The photo below proves that in the end I had a chance to eat my favorite rye bread. It's moist and dense, really sour and earthy in flavor. I could eat this every day!


1 large loaf

1 dl (100 g) sourdough starter
1,5 dl (100 g) coarse rye flour
1,5 dl (150 g) lukewarm water

Combine the ingredients in a baking bowl. Cover with a tea towel and leave at room temperature for 8–10 hours.

Add:
5 dl (500 g) lukewarm water
8 dl (420 g) coarse rye flour

Cover with a tea towel and leave at room temperature for 38–40 hours. The dough gets the sour, earthy flavor during these couple of days. Don't be hasty and bake the bread before its due time! Let time work for you.

Add:
4 dl (260 g) wheat flour
2 tsp salt
1,5 tbsp caraway seeds
1,5 tsp coriander seeds, crushed

Pour the wet mixture into a greased tin. Cover and let rise for about 2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Bake for 1 hour 15 minutes. Take the bred out of the tin and bake for a further 15 minutes. 

Wrap the bread in a tea towel and let cool. When cooled, put the bread in a plastic bag and serve it the next day. 

Enjoy!